FAQ

Robustness

Robust, rugged, ruggedized are terms about a device’s endurance and stability. The terms are pretty much interchangeable, though there are small differences such as a rugged device is designed to be rugged (as Cinside devices) compared to a ruggadised device that has added components to be robust such as a standard smartphone in a protective shell.

A rugged device is one that keeps operating under conditions other than those in the office. The conditions may be extreme or just outdoor. It is the user who define how extreme his working conditions are. The device must cope with the conditions, and not just at one occasion but for life which can easily be 5-10 years for a Cinside device.

A purchaser of a mobile device will carefully evaluate what kind of working conditions the unit will be exposed to. It is probably a good idea to select a unit which is a little more rugged than you actually need. It is far better to be too rugged than not rugged enough, and you may at some point encounter conditions more severe than you originally predicted.

How is rugged defined?

Temperature range

The temperature spec defines the operational temperature range of the unit. Also a temperature range for storage may be specified.

MIL-STD-810G

MIL-STD-810G  is a standard issued by the United States Army’s Developmental Test Command. The standard is comprised of about 24 laboratory test methods cover a wide range of environments.
Cinside products are designed to fulfill a selection of the MIL-STD specs, especially focusing on the vibration and drop tests as we find occurring in the daily operations. 

IP

IP stands for Ingress Protection, and an IP rating is used to specify the level of environmental protection of electrical equipment against solids and liquids. It is defined by international standard IEC 60529.
Cinside product are designed to fulfill IP67 which means dust-proof and able to be immersed in water on 0.15 m depth for 30 minutes.

Practical examples

Practical examples of  the CPR4 device ruggedness are illustrated in the videos below.

The first video demonstrates the robustness of the CPR4 withstanding multiple drops. The CPR4 is operating during the test with all sensors active and transferring data wireless to the smartphone and our CiMonA app. The measured “vibrations” are shown in yellow in the app to the right in the video.

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The following video show the resistance to water and the ability to float.

 

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All types of building materials have different properties, and they all effect the signal in different ways. In general, a dense and thick wall damps the signal more, and the range decreases.
A homogeneous metal plate, eg a white board or metal roof is impossible to penetrate with the energies we are using. Metal reinforcements in concrete walls degrade performance, but as long there are gaps in between bars it is possible.

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First, we have to define what to detect, small or larger movement

We mostly deal with two situations,

  • small 1-10 mm stationary movements (e.g. sitting or unconscious person)
  • person moving around

The range depends on

  • the damping in the path between the sensor and the object. The damping depends on the material properties and its thickness.
  • the size, material and shape of the object
  • the movement size, type and direction
  • the overall surrounding activity, gives how sensitive the sensor can be set

The width of the scanned sector depends on the antenna in the sensor. Cinside sensors typically have a width of 35 to 90 degrees. Attention should be made that the systems are not totally blind outside these typical given angles but have the main sensitivity within that sector.

A rule of thumb is that Cinside CPR4 handheld sensor (10 GHz) can detect a moving person within a 70 degrees sector (35 degrees for the CIP which has a narrower beam and slightly higher sensitivity)

  • up to 2 meters behind a 20 cm reinforced concrete wall
  • up to 10 meters behind an interior wall
  • more than 20 meters without obstacles

With the 2 GHz systems (e.g. HumanFinder and StickRadar) we can achieve more penetration to the cost of small movement sensitivity.

Categories: Rescue, Security
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The necessary motion to cause an alert depends on several parameters

  • the distance to the object
  • the material to penetrate
  • the size and material of the moving object
  • the radar system

E.g for the CPR4

  • at 1 meter distance and a 10 cm brick wall, a millimeter movement will be enough
  • at 5 meters and thicker wall, 10 mm may be needed
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In our motion-sensing devices (e.g. CPR4, CIP, HumanFinder and CiWater), accelerometers sense the device’s self-movement to reduce false alerts when the sensor is moved and to alert the operator that the sensor is moved, shown in yellow in indicators and graphs.

These self-movement sensors are sensitive to very small movements such as when the device is moved, a knock on the wall the sensor is attached to, or a door closing. It is discovered that the vibration sensors can be useful as a complement to the radar during surveillance to detect environmental vibrations. In CiMonA there is an option to show a vibration bar together with a radar motion bar. Below is an example of the vibration view from drop tests.

In the drop-test video the “vibrations” where quite substantial. In applications where more subtle vibrations want to be detected, such as a knock from a survivor or steps from an intruder, we have an option, a 100 times more sensitive sensor than our standard self-motion-detector. This built-in hyper-sensitive vibration sensor is close to the sensitivity of a bulkier geophone. With this compact multi-sensor accelerometer/radar-solution, advanced signal processing and data fusion we can achieve a sensor system capable of classifying different movements more accurately.

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StickRadar is still a concept design (June 2018) but the goal is to keep the folded length below 120 cm.

The overall design will be ergonomic and easy to use.

Check Categories that apply:
 StickRadar
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No, the penetrating capability comes from the electromagnetic waves, also used in radio or mobile phones.

Thermal and other visual technologies have no penetration capability, though they may give the impression sometimes when a movement or temperature difference propagates through a (thin) material. Such as, a thermal camera may catch a temperature difference in wall temperature from a heater on the other side of the wall or a laser may catch the small movements on a wall or window surface from speech on the other side.

Category: General
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No, the penetrating capability comes from the electromagnetic waves, also used in radio or mobile phones.

Thermal and other visual technologies have no penetration capability, though they may give the impression sometimes when a movement or temperature difference propagates through a (thin) material. Such as, a thermal camera may catch a temperature difference in wall temperature from a heater on the other side of the wall or a laser may catch the small movements on a wall or window surface from speech on the other side.

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